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Architect of Design

main-house

Photography by Isaac Alongi
and Carlos Ignacio Morales.

Her intuitive 'cool-as-linen' style graces design magazines worldwide with its casual blend of sophisticated comfort and colonial-Caribbean chic. Having made her name breathing fresh life into the corridors and parlours of historic mansions and great houses in her hometown of Nassau, it is her parents that Amanda Lindroth credits with planting the seeds of her interest in design. Appointing award-winning architects to build a series of homes championing the cause of modern design, Lindroth learned early of the nuances of light and scale. “I am,” she states, “very, very driven by architecture.”
Moving to The Bahamas in 1992, Lindroth’s penchant for building and renovating homes for herself and husband, local property developer, Orjan Lindroth, soon found her lending her design genius to a number of commercial projects from New Providence’s Balmoral Club to Nassau’s Old Fort Bay and Schooner Bay in Abaco. Intent on preserving the integrity of significant structures, Lindroth’s designs effortlessly bridged the gap between what had gone before and what could be.
With a love for Bahamian harbour-town life as well as a passion for eighteenth-century architecture and the great decorators of the twentieth-century – Else de Wolfe, Nancy Lancaster and Maison Jansen to name but a few – Lindroth simultaneously honours historical context while interweaving fresh design elements. Gently lit, her interiors are intimate affairs, paying homage to architectural detail and the holistic interconnection of disciplines. Inspired by the likes of Annabel’s in London and Harry’s Bar in Venice, she jokes, “I always aim to do things which are ‘legendary’. Why make an effort otherwise?”
No surprise then to learn of Lindroth’s love of the grand English country house look. “There are rooms at Chatsworth, the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, of which I never tire,” she enthuses. It is this grand, yet lived in look – homes brimful of paintings, simple flower arrangements and overstuffed drinks’ trays –  that is the essence of Lindroth’s designs. With an ability to make every space feel long-established and inviting, Lindroth creates depth and authenticity by adorning surfaces with still life-type arrangements. Give her a yacht, a beach hut, a mansion – a stable even, and her interiors retain human scale and sensibility, emulating the inherent comforts of the colonial era, while respecting the local vernacular and climate.
Removing only one wall during the renovation of the Old Fort Bay Club to maintain the site’s ‘old Bahamas’ charm, Lindroth states, “The Old Fort’s main salon is small and we were able to create a bar and comfy living area. The ocean breeze is magical – the air conditioner has never been turned on in seven years. It is remarkably cosy… even a bit legendary, I think!” Preferring centuries’ old building techniques over high-tech gadgetry, her designs favour working wooden shutters for cross-ventilation: “We try, for practical and aesthetic reasons, to keep things old-fashioned… I like the doors open to the breeze even in the summer.”
Lindroth’s redesign of The Balmoral Club boasts eighteenth-century, carved wooden fireplaces, oak doors and colossal windows, as well as a romantic sweeping staircases that just beg for the dashing silhouette of a Rhett Butleresque leading man. Juxtapose this with bold, striped upholstery, a smattering of burnt orange throw cushions or the intriguing shadow play of paper-sculpted palms, and you have the quintessential classic-meets-current, vintage-meets-visionary Amanda Lindroth.
With its grand, spacious rooms full of curious artefacts and antiques, it is the designer’s private villa, Ca’Liza, which truly captures the depth and breadth of Lindroth’s design acumen. Taking inspiration from the impressive Palladian façade, the home revels in scale and proportion. Signatures include giant down sofas, antique rattan, seagrass mats and large, packed bookcases intended to offset formality. Plants and shells form central motifs, while lighting is soft and ambient with colour used to accent. Lindroth’s ‘perfect-for-the-Caribbean’ cotton batiks and ikats from China Seas in New York combine with classic soft furnishings to create understated refinement. Charming top-hung Bahamian shutters, a louvered porch, tray ceilings and casement-style shutters enclosing the loggia and portico areas, come together with the Coralina limestone to give the home instant age and softness as well as a distinct sense of place. “The house is two years’ old but it looks like it has been there for centuries,” laughs Lindroth.
Ever evolving the symbiotic relationship between architecture and interiors, Amanda Lindroth’s classic sensibilities are shaped by space and place and an understated yearning to be remembered long after the sands of time have washed away the footprints of those who failed to connect the dots between past, present and future. Her precept is simple: make something beautiful and you make something worth remembering. After all, as Keats said, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

Her intuitive ‘cool-as-linen’ style graces design magazines worldwide with its casual blend of sophisticated comfort and colonial-Caribbean chic. Having made her name breathing fresh life into the corridors and parlours of historic mansions and great houses in her hometown of Nassau, it is her parents that Amanda Lindroth credits with planting the seeds of her interest in design. Appointing award-winning architects to build a series of homes championing the cause of modern design, Lindroth learned early of the nuances of light and scale. “I am,” she states, “very, very driven by architecture.”

Moving to The Bahamas in 1992, Lindroth’s penchant for building and renovating homes for herself and husband, local property developer, Orjan Lindroth, soon found her lending her design genius to a number of commercial projects from New Providence’s Balmoral Club to Nassau’s Old Fort Bay and Schooner Bay in Abaco. Intent on preserving the integrity of significant structures, Lindroth’s designs effortlessly bridged the gap between what had gone before and what could be.

With a love for Bahamian harbour-town life as well as a passion for eighteenth-century architecture and the great decorators of the twentieth-century – Else de Wolfe, Nancy Lancaster and Maison Jansen to name but a few – Lindroth simultaneously honours historical context while interweaving fresh design elements. Gently lit, her interiors are intimate affairs, paying homage to architectural detail and the holistic interconnection of disciplines. Inspired by the likes of Annabel’s in London and Harry’s Bar in Venice, she jokes, “I always aim to do things which are ‘legendary’. Why make an effort otherwise?”

boatNo surprise then to learn of Lindroth’s love of the grand English country house look. “There are rooms at Chatsworth, the seat of the Duke of Devonshire, of which I never tire,” she enthuses. It is this grand, yet lived in look – homes brimful of paintings, simple flower arrangements and overstuffed drinks’ trays –  that is the essence of Lindroth’s designs. With an ability to make every space feel long-established and inviting, Lindroth creates depth and authenticity by adorning surfaces with still life-type arrangements. Give her a yacht, a beach hut, a mansion – a stable even, and her interiors retain human scale and sensibility, emulating the inherent comforts of the colonial era, while respecting the local vernacular and climate.

barRemoving only one wall during the renovation of the Old Fort Bay Club to maintain the site’s ‘old Bahamas’ charm, Lindroth states, “The Old Fort’s main salon is small and we were able to create a bar and comfy living area. The ocean breeze is magical – the air conditioner has never been turned on in seven years. It is remarkably cosy… even a bit legendary, I think!” Preferring centuries’ old building techniques over high-tech gadgetry, her designs favour working wooden shutters for cross-ventilation: “We try, for practical and aesthetic reasons, to keep things old-fashioned… I like the doors open to the breeze even in the summer.”

Lindroth’s redesign of The Balmoral Club boasts eighteenth-century, carved wooden fireplaces, oak doors and colossal windows, as well as a romantic sweeping staircases that just beg for the dashing silhouette of a Rhett Butleresque leading man. Juxtapose this with bold, striped upholstery, a smattering of burnt orange throw cushions or the intriguing shadow play of paper-sculpted palms, and you have the quintessential classic-meets-current, vintage-meets-visionary Amanda Lindroth.

balmoralWith its grand, spacious rooms full of curious artefacts and antiques, it is the designer’s private villa, Ca’Liza, which truly captures the depth and breadth of Lindroth’s design acumen. Taking inspiration from the impressive Palladian façade, the home revels in scale and proportion. Signatures include giant down sofas, antique rattan, seagrass mats and large, packed bookcases intended to offset formality. Plants and shells form central motifs, while lighting is soft and ambient with colour used to accent. Lindroth’s ‘perfect-for-the-Caribbean’ cotton batiks and ikatsfrom China Seas in New York combine with classic soft furnishings to create understated refinement. Charming top-hung Bahamian shutters, a louvered porch, tray ceilings and casement-style shutters enclosing the loggia and portico areas, come together with the Coralina limestone to give the home instant age and softness as well as a distinct sense of place. “The house is two years’old but it looks like it has been there for centuries,” laughs Lindroth.

studyEver evolving the symbiotic relationship between architecture and interiors, Amanda Lindroth’s classic sensibilities are shaped by space and place and an understated yearning to be remembered long after the sands of time have washed away the footprints of those who failed to connect the dots between past, present and future. Her precept is simple: make something beautiful and you make something worth remembering. After all, as Keats said, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

 


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