Home > The Overlooked Entryway

The Overlooked Entryway

entryway-design-caymanThe entryway of a home sets the stage for the entire interior experience and is the transition point from the chaos of our exterior world to our private inner sanctuary. It’s where we step inside, close the door, set down our keys and take a nice deep breath, happy to be home. But, if your entryway isn’t creating that sense of place you so desire, then it’s time to rethink this all-too-important setting.

Often overlooked or not considered as important of a space as, say, the kitchen or bath, the entryway is quite the contrary, offering ample opportunity to ensure that the initial steps inside your home count. As with almost anything we do, we want to create a lasting, positive impression, and your entryway should do this for you each day, as well as for your guests.

Whether you live in a sprawling seaside villa with a designated foyer or your abode is a modern studio with an open floor plan, how you shape your entryway alludes to the entire experience ahead. Regardless of the layout or square footage to work with, a great deal can be done with a little imagination.

When designing your entryway, ask yourself what feeling you want to convey. Do you want your entryway to be calming or energising? What style would you like it to be? Modern, traditional, transitional or eclectic? Would you like the colour palette to be the same as the home’s or make its own statement while relating seamlessly to the entire design?

Next, does your entryway need to be more functional than decorative? For instance, a family of four plus Fido may deem storage most important; whereas a single professional may be more interested in creating a feature vignette with a favourite table, artwork and accessories, caring only slightly about function.

Regardless of your entryway’s style or function, it must always have visual balance – a fundamental principle of interior design.

Visual balance is where symmetry is achieved through the distribution of visual weight, and depending on size, colour, texture and form, this visual weight can change. Look at symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial types of balance to find what works best for your vision. Play with your furniture placement. Experiment with colour. Consider your lighting options, for the right lighting is vital. Hunt for original accessories. Weave in organic elements. And, don’t be afraid to mix materials you wouldn’t normally think go together. You might be pleasantly surprised.

Your home’s entryway is the first interior experience offered and is central to the home’s design story. But even more so, it’s essential to the story of you or your family. As you walk through the front door, the entryway represents a haven of safety and embodies all that happens inside the home – rest and renewal, comfort, love and lasting memories.

So, next time you look at your home’s entryway, ask yourself, does my entryway say, I’m home?


For more information about Design Cayman, contact Brian Macdonald:
Call: 1.345.949.2800
Email:
Visit: www.design-cayman.ky


comments powered by Disqus

Read More

The Distinctive Style of Piet Boon

The work of influential Dutch designer Piet Boon, whose 'total concept' designs encompass...

Read More

John Ryan of Kohler

John is the Vice President, Sales and General Manager, Professional Channel, Kitchen & Bat...

Read More

Up-Lifting

Enhance the value of your home with an easy-to-install residential elevator

Read More

Caribbean Roots, International Growth

OBMI designs island residences, vacation villas, luxury resorts and smart commercial space...

Read More

Caribbean Roots, International Growth

OBMI designs island residences, vacation villas, luxury resorts and smart commercial space...

Read More

Caribbean Roots, International Growth

OBMI designs island residences, vacation villas, luxury resorts and smart commercial space...

Read More

Plane Sailing

Savvy savings for private travel

Read More

Plane Sailing

Savvy savings for private travel

Read More

The Millennial Approach

The poor millennial generation: they get a bad name. They are the 'selfie generation'– l...

Read More